An industry for healthy lives

Europe is at the heart of global vaccine research and production. Most of the activities of the major innovative Vaccines Europe members research based-companies are based in the region.

Manifesto

BUILDING
A HEALTHIER
EUROPE

Protecting European citizens
against vaccine – preventable diseases

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Did you know:

Vaccines are one of the greatest medical achievements in history, saving 2-3 million lives globally every year by preventing infectious diseases1​
Vaccination contributes substantially to health, healthcare systems sustainability and society at large by preventing morbidity and mortality
Vaccines can protect everyone: newborn babies, infants, children, adults and older adults2
Vaccines offer community-wide protection3
Close to 30 diseases today are vaccine-preventable
It costs less than 4,000 Euro (including administration costs) to protect a person for their entire life against the 17 most relevant vaccine-preventable diseases4
Vaccines play an important role in the fight against antimicrobial resistance5
More than 80% of vaccine doses are produced in Europe by R&D-led pharmaceutical companies6

Challenges:

Vaccines are a victim of their own success7:
The absence of severe diseases, due to effective vaccines and vaccination programmes, is leading to the mis-perception that vaccination is not needed anymore
European communities are at risk:
We see an increase of vaccine-preventable diseases in Europe leading to the recurrence of diseases. Despite the goal of eliminating measles by 20208, in the first half of 2018, more than 10,000 cases of measles and 31 deaths were reported in the EU/EEA9
Fake news making the situation worse:
Despite the high-quality standards that apply to vaccine production (> 100 quality checks10 per product), robust clinical trials and strict pharmacovigilance, vaccine safety and effectiveness are repeatedly challenged
Many vaccines are undervalued and underutilised:
Less than 0.5% of health budgets in many European countries are spent on vaccination11,12
The sustainability of vaccine supply is being challenged:
Only a few manufacturers can meet the high-quality standards and handle the high-risk vaccine production processes and development costs. This makes short-term or unexpected changes in vaccine demand difficult to respond to. Finding solutions to this problem requires a concerted effort by all key stakeholders

YOU HAVE THE
OPPORTUNITY &
RESPONSIBILITY
TO EFFECTIVELY
PROTECT EUROPEAN
CITIZENS AGAINST
VACCINE – PREVENTABLE DISEASES!

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    Croatia

    21 TOTAL CASES

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    Czech Republic

    149 TOTAL CASES

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    France

    2.588 TOTAL CASES

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    Greece

    2.238 TOTAL CASES

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    Italy

    1.716 TOTAL CASES

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    Romania

    4.317 TOTAL CASES

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    Slovakia

    161 TOTAL CASES

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    United Kingdom

    1.654 TOTAL CASES

Number of measles cases EU/EEA in the first 6 months of 20189

HARNESS THE 2017-2019 MOMENTUM ON VACCINATION AND PROTECT EUROPEAN CITIZENS AGAINST VACCINE PREVENTABLE DISEASES

December 2018

Council of the European Union Recommendation on strengthened cooperation against vaccine preventable diseases13

August 2018

European Union joint action on vaccination14

April 2018

European Parliament resolution on vaccine hesitancy and the drop in vaccination rates in Europe15

VISION 1:

HEALTH FOR ALL

VACCINES PROTECT EVERYONE: NEWBORNS, INFANTS, CHILDREN, ADULTS AND OLDER ADULTS

The impact of childhood vaccines:

Mortality rates have dropped significantly16; smallpox was eradicated globally in the 1970s; and Europe has been declared “polio-free” since 200217

Maternal immunisation

has the potential to protect newborns from dangerous infectious diseases (e.g. influenza, pertussis)18

Vaccination helps protect the ageing population

and can slow down their physical decline22

Vaccination of healthcare professionals (HCPs):

HCPs need to be vaccinated to protect not only themselves, but also their patients and their friends and families

Vaccination prevents certain cancers:

Hepatitis B vaccination reduces the risk of liver cancer; human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine prevents HPV-related abnormalities which could later become cancer

Vaccines protect patients with chronic disease

from serious infections and their complications (e.g. influenza and pneumococcal vaccinations are specifically recommended for people with diabetes19, heart failure 20 or chronic lung diseases21 )

Safe travels:

Travel vaccinations protect people against infections that are indigenous to certain parts of the world

Vaccinating contributes to creating a healthier community

By getting vaccinated, we protect those who cannot be fully immunised (e.g. immunocompromised patients), as well as those who have not yet been vaccinated (e.g. newborns)

ADOPTING A LIFE-COURSE APPROACH TO VACCINATION WILL HELP MAXIMISE THE BENEFITS OF VACCINATION FOR INDIVIDUALS, PUBLIC HEALTH AND SOCIETY.23

OCCUPATION
LIFESTYLE
HEALTH STATUS
AGE

What Europe can do:

Support immunisation at all stages of life: ensure vaccination policies that contribute to the sustainability of our healthcare systems and the productivity of our societies
Set vaccination goals and deliver their implementation throughout Europe, such as achieving the 95% target of measles vaccination coverage by 202013
Improve confidence in vaccination by establishing a European vaccination information portal to provide online, objective, transparent and updated evidence on vaccines, as already proposed by the EC
75%

STAKEHOLDERS24 EXPRESSED THEIR COMMITMENT TO RAISING THE SEASONAL INFLUENZA VACCINE UPTAKE RATE TO 75% IN ALL PEOPLE AT HIGH-RISK25

ALL HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONALS CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE

Expanding access to vaccine administration reflects HCPs’ shared responsibility to vaccinate (Doctors/GPs, nurses, midwives, pharmacists etc.).27

Did you know:

Healthcare professionals play a crucial role in informing their patients on the importance of vaccination and strengthen community protection
Certain EU countries support vaccine administration by healthcare providers (HCPs) who are in contact with the wider public (e.g. pharmacists), but also with vulnerable communities (e.g. migrants)
Providing vaccination through nonhealthcare settings, such as schools and the workplace, could encourage uptake across all stages in life (e.g. UK offers flu, HPV and meningitis vaccination to children in schools26)

What Europe can do:

Provide guidance for EU countries on how to expand access to vaccination in healthcare and non-healthcare settings
Strengthen education and training on vaccine-preventable diseases, vaccinology, and immunisation in medical curricula for healthcare providers across all sectors
Improve confidence in vaccination by convening a coalition for vaccination bringing together European associations of healthcare providers to promote vaccination, and strengthening partnerships and collaboration on vaccination with international partners, as already proposed by the EC

VISION 2:

EUROPEAN EXCELLENCE

VACCINE SCIENCE AND INDUSTRY NEED
TO REMAIN STRONG IN EUROPE

Did you know:

A wealth of expertise is needed and should be maintained in Europe to innovate, develop and produce highly technical and complex vaccines
More than 80% of vaccine doses produced by the major R&D-led pharmaceutical companies are produced in Europe6. These are vaccines of the highest quality which can protect people worldwide
EU-based vaccine manufacturers cooperate with a wide range of stakeholders, through healthfocused public-private partnerships (PPPs) to contribute to the development of novel vaccines

What Europe can do:

Increase investment in primary prevention in order to keep people healthy for longer periods of time
Facilitate early dialogue with developers, national policy-makers and regulators in order to support the authorisation of innovative vaccines, including for emerging health threats
Enhance the mechanisms to support vaccine R&D and develop new incentives for unmet medical needs, to tackle global health threats such as AMR, or severe epidemic outbreaks of diseases since vaccines have proven to be an effective public health tool in this area
Foster the creation of National Immunization Technical Advisory Groups’ (NITAGs) network and collaboration to increase transparency, reduce duplications and minimise inefficient resources spending on vaccines development to encourage innovation and positively impact citizens’ access
Leverage the IPROVE roadmap28, the first strategic European roadmap outlining the science and technology investments required for vaccines innovation, and launch a multi-stakeholder reflection to implement the priorities agreed and define the research agenda for vaccines and vaccine technologies of the future29

The European vaccine industry is working with stakeholders to ensure that safe, effective and innovative vaccines are available to European citizens. Maintaining and protecting its European home is of utmost importance to all European citizens and their wellbeing. Through investments into new manufacturing plants in numerous EU Member States, vaccine companies continue to show their strong commitment to Europe.

VACCINES ARE AN IMPORTANT TOOL IN THE FIGHT AGAINST ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE

Did you know:

It is estimated that

 

33.000 deaths in Europe every year
are attributed to antibiotic resistant bacteria30,raising the risk of
even more people dying from diseases which we thought were curable

Vaccines can reduce the need for using antimicrobials by reducing:
  • the incidence rate of infectious disease and illnesses caused by AMR bacteria in particular
  • the utilisation of antimicrobials to treat bacterial complications of viral infections, and
  • the rate of antibiotics misuse for viral infections31

What Europe can do:

Foster the use of existing vaccines by integrating life-course vaccination planning into national action plans and secure the appropriate vaccination uptake for the fight against AMR
Support development of innovative vaccines against emerging health threats and AMR pathogens


The 2017 Commission Action Plan on antimicrobial resistance (AMR)32 and the Joint Action on AMR and Healthcare-Associated Infections33 highlight the important role vaccines have in the fight against AMR. Both need strong political support to keep them on the forefront of EU-wide action.

Revisit the 2004 EU Regulation establishing a European Centre for disease
prevention and control in order to enhance the role of the ECDC.

VISION 3:

STRONGER TOGETHER

MAINTAIN A HEALTHY VACCINE DEMAND AND SUPPLY ECOSYSTEM

Did you know:

Shortages of vaccines are of increasing concern in the EU and globally34. The reasons are multiple:
  • Changes in the demand for vaccines depend on the epidemiological situation in different regions
  • Vaccines are highly technical biological products with complex and lengthy (often > 1 year) manufacturing, control and release processes, where over 100 quality controls may take more than 70% of the production time6
  • Labelling and packaging requirements for vaccines differ per country, which significantly reduces supply flexibility across the EU35
  • Vaccine tenders across the EU often do not recognise the long lead times required for proper planning, production and release of vaccines

What Europe can do:

Foster early and continuous dialogue between individual manufacturers and health authorities that allows both sides to better anticipate the evolution of vaccine recommendations and more accurately forecast vaccine demand
Reduce the number of labelling & packaging requirements by evaluating the feasibility of introducing simplified, multi-lingual packs and e-leaflets
Ensure Europe-wide recognition of the Most Economically Advantageous Tender (MEAT) criteria in the scope of tender procurement to encourage continued innovation and incentivise more manufacturers and suppliers to establish sustainable business models
Develop a mechanism for exchanging vaccine supplies from one Member State to another to address outbreaks

E-HEALTH CAN IMPROVE THE IMPLEMENTATION OF NATIONAL VACCINATION PROGRAMMES

Did you know:

Immunisation Information Systems (IIS) are proven as an integral part of well-functioning health systems and are now being implemented (or piloted) throughout the EU36
IIS promote patient engagement and citizen empowerment through the use of automatic reminders, provider assessments, and online access to official immunisation records37
Vaccine registries can identify gaps in vaccine uptake in the population, and facilitate communication to at-risk groups

What Europe can do:

Strengthen European disease surveillance capabilities to better assess infectious disease patterns, vaccines benefit/risks and the impact of vaccination across all ages
Support Member States willing to implement IIS to monitor vaccination uptake rates (e.g. through European Structural Funds)
Develop a common EU citizen vaccination card with standardised information on vaccination history, which could also greatly contribute to facilitating the interpretation of vaccination records and ensuring continuity of immunisation across borders
Ensure coordination between health and digital policies and other initiatives, in particular IIS should be considered as a format for exchange of electronic health records

The 2018 EU Council Recommendation asks that EU countries develop the capacity of healthcare institutions to have electronic information on the vaccination status of European citizens and align ways of collecting and processing the data13

About Vaccines Europe

Vaccines Europe represents major innovative research-based vaccine companies as well as small and medium sized enterprises operating in Europe, which account for a large share of human vaccines used worldwide.

CONCLUSION

EU leaders have a critical role to play by building on the 2017-2019 momentum on vaccination and supporting the implementation of the goals laid out in the Council Recommendation in the EU Member States. Vaccines Europe welcomes the EU vaccination initiatives and encourages public authorities together with all stakeholders to implement them. This will ensure vaccination remains the cornerstone of a successful prevention policy in Europe, which can protect all European citizens against vaccine-preventable diseases.